Google’s History Timeline

1955 — Eric Emerson Schmidt was born on April 27 in Washington, D.C.

1973 — Lawrence Edward Page was born on March 26 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Sergey Mikhailovich Brin was born on August 21 in Moscow, Russia.

1979 — The Brin family, which included young Sergey, his parents and grandmother, arrived in the United States on October 25.

1995 — Larry Page and Sergey Brin met when Brin guided a tour of San Francisco for prospective new Stanford graduate students.

1996 — Page and Brin collaborated on Page’s Back Rub search engine. The first version of Google is released in August on the Stanford Web. The address: google.stanford.edu. A little over a year later, the search engine left Stanford servers because it took up too much bandwidth.

1997 — Google.com was registered as a domain name. The young inventors tried to sell Google through the venture capital firm of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB). After unsuccessfully pitching the search engine to all likely buyers, they gave up the idea of selling.

1998 — Google was getting more than 10,000 queries a day. Andy Bechtolsheim, a founder of Sun Microsystems, watched the demo for Google and immediately wrote a $ 100,000 check to get the company started. Google became an official corporation on September 7. A few weeks after incorporation, Craig Silverstein became Google’s first employee. PC magazine recognized Google as the search engine of choice and one of the Top 100 Web Sites for 1998.

1999 — After several months of operating out of a rented bedroom and garage, Google opened its first Palo Alto office. Later in the year, the company moved to Bayshore Drive in nearby Mountain View.Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, in partnership with Sequoia Capital, provided Google with additional venture capital of $ 25 million. Brin and Page finally dropped out of the Stanford graduate studies program. Omid Kordestani, the company ’ s twelfth employee and its first nonengineer, joined Google as head of global sales. Kordestani is credited with creating the advertising model that led to Google’s early and continuing financial glory. Charlie Ayers, who once cooked for the Grateful Dead, joined Google as its chef.

2000 — By mid – year, Google searches had swollen to 18 million per day, and the Google index grew to more than 1 billion documents, making it the largest search engine in the world. The first ten foreign – language versions of Google.com were released, available in French, German, Italian, Swedish, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Norwegian, and Danish. Later in the year, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean languages were added. Yahoo! selected Google as its default search provider. Google began selling AdWords, its key – word – related advertising.

2001 — Eric Schmidt joined Google as its first chairman and later in the year became chief executive officer. Google acquired Deja.com ’ s discussion group site UseNet and merged it into Google Groups. This was Google’s first acquisition. “ Don ’ t be evil ” was first heard in a meeting and later became Google’s informal ethical motto.

2002 — Larry Page approached his alma mater, the University of Michigan, about scanning their library into Google’s cache of pages. Google announced it would provide search services to AOL.com, Compuserve, and Netscape. Inspired by the September 11 terrorist attacks, Google News launched with 4,000 news sources. Froogle shopping services went online. Not much of a success, it later was renamed Google Product Search.

2003 — The American Dialect Society voted google the most useful word of 2002. The company acquired Pyra Labs/Blogger. AdSense went into service for advertisers. Registration opened for Google’s first Code Jam programming competition. 2004 — Google moved to its new Mountain View campus, nicknamed Googleplex. Gmail became available as a free e – mail service. Google announced it would go public on April 29. Google went public on Friday, August 13, with an initial public offering price of $ 85. Google quietly started digitizing the University of Michigan ’ s library in July. Later in the year, “ Google Print for Libraries ” project was announced. The project has had several name changes and most lately is called the Print Library Project. The social networking site Orkut went online.

2005 — Google raised another $ 4.2 billion through a second stock offering. The company acquired Picasa, the popular photo – sharing website. Its first lobbyist office opened in Washington, D.C., with a staff of one. Google Maps, Google Earth, and iGoogle were released. Urchin (Web traffic metrics) was purchased. The first Summer of Code took place, a three – month, $ 2 million program aiming to help computer science students contribute to open source development. Google Talk went online, a Windows application enabling Gmail users to talk on Instant Message with a friend using a computer microphone and speaker. The service does not require a phone and is free.

2006 — The U.S. Justice Department demanded records of millions of search – engine users. Google successfully fended off the demand in court. Google went live in China. By purchasing dMarc Broadcasting, a radio advertising company, Google expanded offline activity. Google (the verb) was added to the Oxford English Dictionary. Google purchased YouTube. Dr. Larry Brilliant was hired to be the executive director of Google.org, the company ’ s philanthropic arm.

2007 — Fortune named Google as best company to work for in the United States. Gmail became available to everyone. Previously, it was available by invitation only. Street View in Google Maps was launched in five U.S. cities. Later in the year, Sky was initiated inside Google Earth, showing layers for constellations and virtual tours of the galaxies. Hot Trends began listing the current 100 most active queries, serving as a global subconscious indicating what the masses are thinking about at almost any moment. Viacom filed $ 1 billion suit against Google for airing its programs on YouTube without permission or pay. The $ 3.2 billion purchase of DoubleClick sparked complaints that Google was becoming too dominant in the advertising industry. Soon after the acquisition, Google laid off 300 DoubleClick employees. Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki were married in theBahamas. The first CNN/YouTube debates took place, first between Democratic presidential candidates and later between Republicans. Google formed the Open Handset Alliance to work on its Android project. Larry Page and Lucinda Southworth were married on Necker Island in the Caribbean. The Queen of England launched The Royal Channel on YouTube, the first monarch to establish a video presence this way.

2008 — Yahoo! agreed to use some Google ads on its search engine, a controversial agreement that fell under intense public and political scrutiny. The company bid in the 700 MHz spectrum wireless communication auction. Google Health became available. For the first time ever on the Internet, Google provided real – time stock quotes. Google launched Chrome, its first Web browser. A satellite with the Google logo was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The satellite will provide high – resolution photos for Google’s mapping service.

[Source]

Google Speaks: Secrets of the Worlds Greatest Billionaire Entrepreneurs, Sergey Brin and Larry Page

Google Speaks: Secrets of the World's Greatest Billionaire Entrepreneurs, Sergey Brin and Larry Page

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8 Responses to Google’s History Timeline

  1. Thanks for the post.

  2. Jen Agier says:

    Google didn’t acquire Flickr…Yahoo! did.

  3. Pingback: History Of The Strawberry And The Strawberry Tree « Eco 1st Technology Group

  4. lalalalala says:

    What happens after 2008 this is 2011……

  5. John Kingerski says:

    Hi

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